Irish History Podcast
Transportation was a particularity cruel punishment. For centuries those condemned to this fate were shipped to penal colonies on the far side of the globe to serve out their sentences. It has become synonymous with injustice during the famine when many caught stealing food suffered this fate.    
For this podcast I dug deep into the archives and found the story of the Nangle family whose lives were ripped apart after they were caught stealing sheep. 
Their story also gives us an insight into life in Dublin prisons during the famine. The second part of the show is somewhat different focusing on the bizarre and perverse chapters in the entire famine - the arrival of the french celebrity chef Alexis Soyer to Dublin in 1847 to help famine victims.
 
This episode is brought to you by www.irishnewspaperarchives.com/podcast - the world’s largest and oldest online database of Irish newspapers. Containing nearly 300 years of Irish newspapers, Irish Newspaper Archives.com is an  essential tool for anyone interested Irish history or genealogy.
 
Listeners of the Irish history podcast can get 40% off monthly and yearly subscriptions by using the coupon code Pod40 at www.irishnewspaperarchives.com/podcast
 

 
Direct download: Final.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Dublin is often forgotten in the story of the Great Famine. While death rates in the capital were not as severe as the west of Ireland, the city suffered nevertheless. The show follows the story of the Mulherins, a family who fled famine in their home in Co Leitrim and settled in the Smithfield - Stoneybatter area of Dublin. They quickly found life in the capital city was very different but not necessarily easier...

The show also looks at life in one of the city workhouses and how prostitution increased dramatically during the late 1840s.

****Become a patron of the show today and get the 78 minute audiobook of An Emigrants Narrative. This is the first time this fascinating personal account written by William Smith in 1850 has been released on audio. Smith crossed the Atlantic with Irish emigrants in the winter of 1847 and his account is an amazing insight into what our ancestors endured.

You can get this today at www.patreon.com/irishpodcast

Direct download: The_Famine_in_Dublin_.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:23am EDT

From January 1847 Irish people desperately trying to flee the famine began to leave the island in huge numbers. 

220,000 left in that year alone and by 1853 more than one in six people who had lived in Ireland in 1845 had emigrated. While we know a lot about where they went and the horrendous conditions they faced, we know less about the lives they left behind. This show tells that story through the words of these Irish emigrants.

Research for this show took me into the archives of the National Library of Ireland. After sifting through what hundreds of letters from Famine emigrants this podcast publishes several for the first time since the 1840s. These never before heard accounts give a unique insight into the lives of Irish people in 1847 as they prepared to leave Ireland forever. Their stories are far more complex and all too often more tragic than we imagine. 

This is only possible through the support of patrons - previously I would not have been able to devote the necessary time to one episode. If you want to become a patron today and get bonus content check out patreon.com/irishpodcast.

Thanks to Clare Ryan, Jamie Goldrick, Thom McDermott and Dave Lordan who narrate the letters.  

 

Direct download: Voice_from_Black_47.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:38am EDT

This series continues the story of the Great Famine into the notorious year of Black '47 by returning to the town of Skibbereen. Looking at how life in the town changed it details the horrifying lives many had to endure. However starvation was not the only way the famine changed Ireland and the show begins by looking at the unusual story of James Dillon, a coroner in Co Offaly who was tasked with investigating two suspicious deaths in December 1846. 

You can get bonus content by supporting the show at patreon.com/Irishpodcast

Direct download: Black_47_A_World_Turned_Upside_Down_.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:20am EDT

As the situation deteriorated in Ireland in late 1846, the two Cork towns of Youghal and Skibbereen experienced the unfolding horrors in very different ways. The people of Youghal, due to local dynamics, were in a position to rise up against some of the causes of famine. Through the Autumn of 1846 they launched an insurrection in a desperate bid to stop food being exported. However at Skibbereen in west Cork the people found themselves in a far worse situation. Ravaged by severe starvation from as early as October, the town became notorious for the horrific conditions its inhabitants faced.

You can support the show and get lots of bonus content on patreon at www.patreon.com/irishpodcast.

Direct download: Insurrection__Starvation.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:46am EDT

Many travellers who visited the west of Ireland in the 19th century considered it as a frontier of sorts. They were more often than not deeply racist, yet we still rely heavily on their accounts to reconstruct a picture of life at the time. In this show I question  how reliable their accounts are. In an effort to create a more vivid picture of life in the 1840s I have interviewed with two archaeologists - Franc Myles and Eve Campbell for this show. 

You can support the show at patreon.com/irishpodcast

You can contact me at info@irishhistorypodcast.ie

www.facebook.com/irishhistorypodcast

www.twitter.com/irishhistory

Direct download: History_vs_Reality_-_What_was_life_in_the_1840s_really_like_.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:13am EDT

Join Fin as he treks around Achill island visiting Ireland's newest beach and the ruins of a famine era village.

To get exclusive content from Achill check out patreon.com/irishpodcast

Direct download: Achill_Island_Day1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:20pm EDT

Through the summer of 1846 Ireland had endured terrible hunger and suffering. However against the odds the numbers who had starved to death were few. As many waited in great anticipation for the coming harvest, disaster struck when the potato blight returned on a much wider scale than in 1845. As the Irish MP Daniel O'Connell stated a 'death dealing famine' was on the cards. This show begins with a story of emigration and passengers on an early coffin ship. 

In the coming days I am heading to Achill Island of the west coast, where I will be making a series of podcasts and videos about life there during the Famine. You can find out more at www.patreon.com/irishpodcast

Direct download: In_the_Valley_of_the_Shadow_of_Death.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:30am EDT

Next week you can join me on a virtual road trip to the 1840s! Tune in to find out more...

www.patreon.com/irishpodcast

Direct download: Achill.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:04am EDT

The summer of 1846 was a tense time in Ireland. As food grew scarce lawlessness, riots and violence became frequent. Everyone eagerly awaited May 15th when the British Government would open it's emergency food depots. Perhaps then the tensions and anxiety at the heart of Irish society would ease? However would the food in these emergency depots be enough to stave off famine until the harvest was ready in Autumn? 

Find out in this episode. 

(Apologies that this show is late. Research took much longer than usual and then the writing proved tricky in places and I had to rewrite several parts. Thanks for your patience).

You can support the show on patreon at www.patreon.com/irishpodcast

Book tickets on the tour at www.facebook.com/irishhistorypodcast or info@irishhsitorypodcast.ie

Direct download: Summer_of_Starvation.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:52am EDT